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Jehovah Witness

Jehovah's Witnesses are a Restoration nest Christian denomination whose beliefs are vastly different from mainstream Christianity. This group is perhaps most popularly known for their door to door proselytizing and the manner through which they avoid the celebration of common holidays and instead share one of their two printed brochures that each focus on different lessons from their teachings and the Bible that they follow. Worldwide the membership within Jehovah's Witnesses exceeds over 8 million people. They have 15 million people attend their conventions each year and almost 20,000,000 attending their annual memorial services. Jehovah's Witnesses are currently directed by a group of governing elders based out of Brooklyn. These governing elders interpret the Bible and establish all of their doctrines based on that interpretation.

They believe that Armageddon is eminent and that God's kingdom over earth will be the only solution to all of the current problems faced by humanity. The group emerged out of a Bible student movement in the late 1870s. The leadership of the time was Joseph Franklin Rutherford who believed that Isaiah was a book of the Bible meant to distinguish them from other Bible student groups. They bestowed upon themselves a new name so as to distinguish themselves from other groups and to symbolize a break with previous founders.

Jehovah's Witnesses today are most popular for their preaching door-to-door and the distribution of popular religious literature known as the watchtower. Jehovah's Witnesses refuse to engage in military service and they refuse to accept blood transfusions. They reject the imminent mortality of the soul, the Trinity, and hellfire. They believe that all three of these are unscriptural doctrines. They also refused to observe holidays and customs such as Christmas, Easter, and birthdays because of their origins with the pagan beliefs which Jehovah's Witnesses view as incompatible Christianity

Those who adhere to the beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses consider themselves in the truth. They consider secular society to be influenced by Satan and morally corrupt. Many of their social interactions with people who are not of the same church are limited aside from door-to-door preaching. They have a congressional discipline known as disfellowshipping. This refers to formally shunning those who are no longer members of the church but were previously baptized or those two have broken the current beliefs. People who have been shunned and disassociated with the church can be brought back to the faith if they repent.